Rocky Mountain National Park Series – Photography in the Park

Rocky Mountain National Park Series – Photography in the Park

Erik Stensland, an Estes Park resident and photographer, visits Rocky Mountain National Park regularly to photograph all the beauty within; spring flowers, sunsets and waterfalls overflowing. Like many creative nature enthusiasts, Stensland prefers to wander outdoors in solitude.

"I just need silence to rethink things. It keeps me whole and sane. I need that time of personal reflection." - Erik Stensland 

Though you aren't going to become his best hiking buddy, Stensland is willing to share some of his wisdom when it comes to taking photographs while venturing through the park. And it's advice you'll want to take! 

Tip #1 - Timing is Everything

Aim to photograph your desired subject or area when the light is warm. If you can shoot within 15-20 minutes of sunrise or sunset, you'll be amazed by the results. More people prefer sunrise photos than sunset photos, due to the clarity during that time of day. Winds die down and urban activity slows significantly during the night, leaving a window of time just before and during sunrise that provides a more clean and clear atmosphere. 

Tip #2 - What Are You Shooting?

It's easy to become distracted by everything around you and before you know it, you've taken 300 photos in the first 15 minutes of your hike and you're late for that sunrise shot you'd planned on getting! Before you head out, be very clear about what the subject of your image is. Why did you come out today? What did you hope to photograph? What was the overall feeling you wanted to convey with this image? Focus on one clear subject and you'll hike home feeling triumphant. 

Tip #3 - Learn to Love Cloudy Days 

Sure, it may go against your nature to hope for clouds in the sky as you pack up for a day outside. But in Stensland's opinion, if there aren't clouds in the sky, it isn't worth going out with your camera in tow. "Clouds really create the emotion in the image", he says. Subjects such as waterfalls and shadowy forested areas benefit greatly from the diffused light that grey skies bring. Clouds truly are nature's softbox, so take advantage of overcast days!

He sells his images online and in various galleries in New Mexico and Colorado. If you're more of a social media guru, he shares images daily on his Facebook and Twitter with inspiring messages attached for you to enjoy (free of charge!) 

Motivational Monday – ‘A Slice of Colorado’s Autumn’

Motivational Monday – ‘A Slice of Colorado’s Autumn’

After a nature-filled Labor Day weekend, what better way to usher in another week than a short film featuring Colorado's fast-approaching Fall season?

Toby Harriman is a photographer, timelapser, content creator and a social influencer. He has worked with large clients, such as CBS, CNBC, Red Bull and many more. As a kid growing up in Colorado, he can appreciate and capture the beauty and wonder that is this amazing state - and he's done just that in his most recent short film, 'A Slice of Colorado's Autumn.'

"During September and October of 2013 and 2015, I drove from San Francisco back to my birth state of Colorado to experience a bit of fall," explains Harriman. "Growing up there, I was young and not really into photography yet. So it is amazing to go back every year now and see it with a whole new perspective. I did sneak one clip in from summer."

A Slice of Colorado's Autumn from Toby Harriman on Vimeo.